Posts filed under Education

Wisconsin Law Teaching Fellowship Seeks Application Now

The Hastie Fellowship at Wisconsin is looking for applicants.  In full disclosure, I am biased and a cheerleader for this program, which I credit with having the biggest impact on my ability to enter legal academia.  It's an LLM program, with a two-year residency at the University of Wisconsin School of Law.  The program has an excellent reputation as THE pipeline program for minority law professors.

Posted on February 17, 2013 and filed under Cherokee Scholars, Education, Indian Scholars.

Ellen Cushman to speak at Univ of Arkansas - Feb 14th

Ellen Cushman, a noted scholar of Cherokee language and literacy will speak on “Cherokee Writing:  Mediating Traditions, Codifying Nation” on Thursday, February 14, at 4 p.m. in Room 411 of Kimpel Hall on the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville campus.

“Cherokees have a long history of conceptualizing the use of media quite differently from the alphabetic norm in order to accommodate the Cherokee language and develop the nation as a sovereign entity,” Cushman said, previewing her talk.  “Cherokees use a unique, indigenous writing system to mediate our traditions, to pursue our cultural perseverance, and to maintain our linguistic heritage.”

Cushman will offer a brief overview of the history of this mediation, revealing how one tribe continues to mediate its tradition through writing and digital videos, games, and online language classes.  Drawing on five years of ethnohistorical research, the talk will describe the evolution of the Cherokee writing system from script, to print, to digital forms and show how it continues to serve important linguistic, cultural, and historical functions for the modern Cherokee Nation, marking the nation’s civility and sovereignty at once.

Cushman is Professor of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures at Michigan State University.  A Cherokee Nation citizen and a former Cherokee Nation Sequoyah Commissioner,  she is the author of The Struggle and the Tools: Oral and Literate Strategies in an Inner City Community and  The Cherokee Syllabary: Writing the People’s Perseverance .

Ellen Cushman standing photo.jpg
Posted on February 4, 2013 and filed under Education, Cherokee Scholars, Women, Cherokee Humanities, Language.

Cherokee Study Abroad Program - Summer 2013

Professor Chris Teuton (now at UNC-Chapel Hill) would like to spread the word of the "Cherokee Study Abroad," program which will be held May 27-June 28, 2013 from Qualla Boundary to Tahlequah.  The course is "an immersive study abroad course taught by Cherokee scholars across Cherokee territory, and in conversation with Cherokee community."    Deadline is Feb. 14th.

Digital brochure below:

cherokeecountry.jpg

A New Cherokee Blog of Interest

Ryan Mackey's new blog on Cherokee-related and other things has been on-line for a few months and I'd like to call attention to it.  To check out the blog, click here.  Below you'll find an early excerpt from the blog to give you a flavor of his introspection: I used to be a sovereignty sort of fellow, I even wanted to be a tribal attorney and "fight" as a modern ᏗᏟᎯ. That was until I spent some time in our communities as an adult.  I still think that we need those sort of legal warriors, I have since realized that’s not my path.  I know our ᎠᏂᎦᏚᏩᎩ people have always been an ᎠᏰᎵ, a Nation, but not by ᎠᏂᎦᎵᏏ definitions.  Those ᏲᏁᎦ people had to remake us in their own image.  I know how they used colonialism and hegemony to oppress our ancestors but now they don’t even need too.  We can do that ourselves - that’s self determination for you....  I had better explain myself, I am not anti-Indian or completely self loathing or even unstable - not really.  I am just afraid that we are focused on the wrong things.  It maybe that we are on the right path, but it is likely that if we take the time to re-evaluate our system we will find that we are beyond our scope and out of step with our needs and priorities.  I am only suggesting that we re-evaluate our foundation while we still have the means.

Steve Russell's New Book

2016

2016

Cherokee author Steve Russell's new book is out - as blogged by Matthew Fletcher.  Steve humbly failed to shamelessly self-promote this, so I'll do it for him.  Congrats Steve and happy semi-retirement!  The book can be purchased (at a very reasonable price) by Carolina Academic Press here.

New Law Review Article - Cherokee Legal History

Judge J. Matthew Martin (Associate Judge at EBCI) has a new law review article out The Nature and Extent of the Exercise of Criminal Jurisdiction by the Cherokee Supreme Court:  1823-1835 at 32 North Carolina Central Law Rev. 27 (2009).  The most interesting part of the article is the evidence that the Cherokee Nation did exercise criminal jurisdiction over non-Indians (albiet over the non-Indians' objection).  It's on westlaw and an earlier version of the final piece is here.

Posted on April 26, 2010 and filed under Cherokee Nation, Eastern Band, Education, Research, Sovereignty.

Tribal Law Conference in conjunction with Native Nations Law Symposium, Feb 11-12th, 2010

The Annual Tribal Law Conference at the KU School of Law will be held this year in conjunction with the Four Tribes in Kansas' Native Nations Law Symposium.  Day one (Feb 11th) at KU Law.  Day two (Feb. 12th) at Prairie Band Casino and Resort.  Agenda and on-line registration here.  Among the topics are tribal economic development, gaming, tribal court jurisdiction, probate reform and ethics in tribal government.  Cherokee Nation tribal citizens Stacy Leeds, Mark Dodd, and Melody McCoy are among the speakers.